Fisheries

Fisheries

Illegal, Unreported, Unregulated (IUU) Fishing: The “Saiko” Story

Transshipping of fish is banned in some West African countries, including Senegal, Cote d’Ivoire and Guinea. In Ghana, the practice is authorized under a special permission and can only occur in port under the supervision of an agent of the Fisheries Commission. In recent years, a new form of transshipment developed between industrial vessels and the artisanal canoes, with the canoes buying frozen by-catch from trawlers at sea. Although it is deemed illegal and prohibited under the Fisheries Act 625 of 2002 (Section 132), the business has grown due to its lucrative nature in many coastal communities of Ghana. This is known as ‘SAIKO’ fishing. It is widely practiced in some landing sites in the Central, Western and Greater Accra Regions.
As one by-catch collector puts it, “with SAIKO, harvest is always assured”. The problem of SAIKO is compounded by overfishing, poor public education, greed and weak fisheries law enforcement mechanisms. This brief proposes practical enforcement measures to reduce illegal fishing activities.


Fisheries Commission Presentation

PowerPoint presentation made to the Fisheries Commission on The Sustainable Fisheries Management Project.


Small Pelagic Fisheries Data Collection: Orientation training Manual

This training manual is written for persons who have been selected to collect data on Ghana’s small pelagic fishery. It is aimed at introducing fisheries data collectors to the basic protocols for collecting and processing fisheries data. It is intended to foster interactive and participatory learning approaches in the process of data collection.


Small Pelagic Fisheries Data Collection: Orientation Training Report

Report of fisheries profile data collector training. The aim of the two-day training workshop was to orient data collection team to the purpose of assessment and data collection protocol.


Results Of Field Survey For The Small Pelagic

Report of preliminary survey results of a field survey of fishermen and fishmonger/processors. It summarizes the preliminary results of a field survey of fishermen and women in order to provide inputs for a small pelagic fisheries profile to be prepared under the USAID-funded Sustainable Fisheries Management Project (SFMP) in Ghana.


Addressing Illegal Fishing through Education and Sensitization for Sustainable Fisheries Management in Ghana

Report of research into illegal transshipment of fish at sea between small-scale canoes fishers and industrial trawlers operating in Ghana, also known as Saiko fishing, is widely practiced in Axim, Elmina and Apam. Majority of fishers in Axim and Apam are aware that Saiko fishing is illegal under the Fisheries Act, Act 625, 2002. However, fishers in these communities consider their practice to be legitimate.


Regional Workshops on Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) /Saiko Fishing: Presentations, Discussions and Outcomes of Stakeholder Forum on How to Stop Fish Transshipment by Artisanal Fishermen in Western and Central Regions of Ghana

The regional fisheries stakeholders’ workshops form part of the project on Addressing Illegal Fishing through Education and Sensitization of Stakeholders for Sustainable Fisheries Management in Ghana. It is a direct follow-up activity to the rapid assessment of the status of illegal, unreported and unregulated (IUU) with respect to Saiko fishing in 3 landing beaches at Apam, Elmina and Axim.


Illegal, Unreported and Unregulated (IUU) / Saiko Fishing Sensitization Strategy Workshop: Proceedings and Final Sensitization Strategy

The Sensitization Strategy Workshop is a direct follow-up to the Regional Fisheries workshop organized in the Central and Western Region on the 27th January 2015 and 3rd February 2015 respectively. It was organized in Takoradi, Western Region on 17th February 2015.


Analysis of the Adequacy of Legislative Framework in Ghana to Support Fisheries Co-management and Suggestions for a Way Forward

This report has been prepared to support the implementation of the Integrated Coastal and Fisheries Governance Initiative, referred to locally as Hen Mpoano, led by the Coastal Resources Center of the University of Rhode Island and funded by the U.S. Agency for International Development. One of the components of the Fisheries Governance Initiative is the development of an appropriate and supportive institutional framework to implement fisheries co-management in Ghana.


The Nearshore Rocky Reefs of Western Ghana, West Africa: Baseline ecological research survey

Ghana’s coastal region supports productive fisheries that provide a major supply of protein and significant economic support to the nation. Over the decades poor fisheries governance and management – in large part due to the open access nature of the fisheries, overfishing and the use of destructive fishing methods – have led to marked declines in fisheries landings.  With the majority of studies focusing on the more productive and commercially more important pelagic and deep demersal environments, ecological information on the near shore rocky reef habitats (NSRH) of Ghana and West Africa in general is very limited. The present study fills this knowledge gap, by investigating the general status of the NSRH and fisheries of western Ghana, providing baseline information on the fish, invertebrate and benthic communities.


Ghana Coastal Fisheries Governance Dialogue: Presentations, Discussions and Outcomes from a Stakeholder Forum on Issues for Reforming Governance of Ghana’s Coastal Fisheries

The Fisheries Governance Dialogue highlighted that much common ground exists between fisheries stakeholders in their understanding of the need for reform. A critical point emphasized by this meeting was the need for ongoing dialogue to ensure that the voices of all stakeholders are considered in the process of designing and implementing co-management and nested systems. As momentum for implementing co-management builds, such dialogue needs to occur on a more regular basis than has been provided for by the two Fisheries Governance Dialogue meetings held to date. Conversations following the dialogue have led to a proposal for a Fisheries Co-Management Working Group to be convened in Accra. The objectives of this group would be to build on lessons highlighted in the dialogue, co-ordinate efforts at piloting co-management systems, and provide a forum to consolidate learning from such pilots.


Presentation made at the Conference on Fisheries and Coastal Environment (The Accra Conference 2017): Towards a Community-Based Management Plan for Ankobra River Estuarine Fishery

Co-management or collaborative management is a promising means of improving resource conditions, particularly, where centralized fisheries management is a challenge. In collaborative management, authority and responsibility for managing fisheries resources are shared between government and resource users. A pilot community-based fisheries management planning process for the Ankobra River estuary was initiated under the auspices of the USAID-funded Sustainable Fisheries Management Project (SFMP). During this process, rapid rural appraisals were conducted; estuarine fish species were inventoried and prioritized by resource users on the basis of food security importance and commercial value. Subsequently, a management committee which was constituted led the identification of fishing grounds and development of management measures such as closed seasons and closed areas for the priority species. The information gathered was used to prepare a community-based fisheries management plan for the Ankobra River estuary. The process used in this pilot project is proving to be a successful and useful approach for managing the fisheries of small systems such as estuaries and lagoons.