Greater Amanzule Wetland Conservation

Greater Amanzule Wetland Conservation

Final Report on Amanzule Wetland Conservation Activities

This report summarizes progress made on these activities. Drawing on the lessons learned during the 3-month implementation period and stakeholders’ input into the process, the report also suggests strategies and activities required for transitioning from awareness raising to field-based conservation and wetland management planning.


Annual Report for Conservation of Greater Amanzule Wetlands Phase II

This report presents progress made on these activities. Drawing on the lessons learned during the initial implementation period and stakeholders’ input into the process, the report also suggests strategies and activities required for transitioning from wetland management plan development to field-based implementation of actions within the wetland management plan.


Progress Report on Greater Amanzule Wetlands Conservation Phase II Activities

This report outlines the progress to date per the agreed deliverables specified in the Annex 3 of the letter of intent (LoL) between Hen Mpoano and the Coastal Sustainable Landscapes Project for the implementation of coastal sustainable landscape management activities. It covers the period January 1 – March 31, 2014 and highlights activities planned, expected outputs and related accomplishments.


Celebrate Greater Amanzule Wetland

The Greater Amanzule Wetlands (GAW) covers approximately 50,000 hectares of land stretching from the Ankobra Estuary in the Nzema East and the Ellembelle districts in Ghana, to the Tanoe-Ehy marsh at the Ivory Coast border. The GAW is rich in biodiversity and supports numerous livelihood activities. Over 50 communities comprising more than 7,000 farming and fishing families depend directly on the GAW resources for food, fuel-wood, fish, shell fish and drinking water. Recent flora and fauna surveys conducted by the Wildlife Division of the Forestry Commission recorded over 59 plant species with more than 59 percent covering peat swamps and mangrove forests. The faunal surveys identified 40 mammal species, 78 bird species and 17 amphibian and reptile species. The beaches connected to the GAW also present suitable sites for nesting of sea turtles.